ABOUT

ABOUT THE MUSEUM

The Museum presents a vivid account of Communism focusing on Czechoslovakia in general and on Prague in particular. A variety of fields are represented including: daily life, politics, history, sport, economics, education, “the arts”, media propaganda, the Peoples’ Militias, the secret police, censorship, judiciary and coercive institutions (including the Stalinist show-trials), and political labour camps.

It is the first and only Museum in Prague (since the Velvet Revolution) exclusively devoted to a system established in the sphere of the former Soviet Union. Opened in 2001, the original items and installations containing authentic artifacts are displayed in the three main rooms of the Museum and conveniently follow the themes of: Communism The Dream, The Reality and The Nightmare. There is also a projection room with regular short film screenings.

The Museum occupies 500 m2 inside the Savarin Palace situated in the center of Prague on Na Prikope Street 10 near the metro station MUSTEK (line A and B) It is above McDonalds and open from 9 am to 9 p.m. (including holidays). V.I Lenin must be turning in his grave.

We hope you take the time whilst in Prague to learn a little about it’s recent history from a Czech point of view. Concise, objective, but certainly not pro Communist, the Museum is a great way to get a basic understanding of how this amazing Nation lived through such  difficult and totalitarian times.

HISTORY OF THE MUSEUM

The Museum focuses on the totalitarian regime from the February coup in 1948 to its rapid collapse in November 1989. The theme of the Museum is “Communism- the Dream, the Reality, and the Nightmare” and visitors will be treated to a fully immersive experience.  Factories, a historical schoolroom, an Interrogation Room, or the video clips in our Television Time Machine are all part of the experience. The Museum is a great introduction before you step back even further in time and experience the wonders of The Golden City.

This is the first Museum in Prague (since the Velvet Revolution) exclusively devoted to a system established in the sphere of the former Soviet Union. The original items and meticulous installations containing authentic artifacts are displayed in the three main rooms (please see the virtual tour)
The Museum presents a vivid account of Communism, focusing generally on Czechoslovakia and particularly on Prague in a variety of areas, such as:

  • daily life
  • politics
  • history
  • sport
  • economics
  • education
  • the „arts“ (such as the so-called Socialist Realism movement)
  • media propaganda
  • the Peoples’ Militias
  • the army
  • the police (including the dreaded secret STB apparatus)
  • censorship
  • judiciary and coercive institutions (including the Stalinist show-trials and political labour camps)

Highlights from the displays include rare items from the Museum’s own comprehensive archive as well as material obtained by the organisers from major collections, both public and private.

The Museum of Communism was created for the display and interpretation of objects and historic documents. It stands as an authoritative historical narrative relating to this 20th-century phenomenon. It is, however, in no way intended by the organisers to be a filter for contemporary political issues in the Czech Republic.

The organisers of the Museum would like to express their gratitude to the following people for their participation:

Jana Kristyna Kaplan, Kabinet soudní dokumentace a vězeňství pan PhDr. Aleš Kýr a paní Kafková, PhDr. Čestmír Kráčmar, PhDr.  MartaSylvestrová, Dagmar Hochová, Viktor Šlajchert, Gene Deitch, Dr. Otto Pick, Glen Emery, František Zahrádka, Jan Stránský, Mgr. AlexandrKoráb, Mgr. Tomáš Carba, Mathew Ginn, Joel Winn, Dr. Tracy Dove and others…